Location

Outside of Building
31 Ferry Street, Suite 2
Schuylerville, NY 12871
 
(518) 695-3040
Fax: (518) 695-3150
 
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Office Hours

Monday: Closed
Tuesday: 11:00-7:00
Wednesday: 9:00-5:00
Thursday: 9:00-5:00
Friday 9:00-5:00

Saturday:

8:00-Noon
Call ahead
Sunday: Closed

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Vision Therapy

Some visual conditions cannot be treated adequately with just glasses, contact lenses and/or patching, and are best resolved through a program of Vision Therapy.

What is Vision Therapy?

Vision Therapy is an individualized, supervised program designed to correct visual-motor and/or perceptual-cognitive deficiencies. Sessions include procedures designed to enhance the brain's ability to control: eye alignment, eye teaming, eye focusing abilities, and eye movements.

Visual-motor skills and endurance are developed through the use of specialized computer and optical devices, including therapeutic lenses, prisms, and filters. During the final stages of therapy, the patient's newly acquired visual skills are reinforced and made automatic through repetition and by integration with motor and cognitive skills.

Who Can Benefit From Vision Therapy?

Patients of all ages can benefit from vision therapy. The nature of the therapy program varies with the condition treated. For example, a three-year-old child with amblyopia, or "lazy eye", may simply have the better eye patched for a short period of time. An eight-year-old child with strabismus, or "crossed eye", may require therapy for a period of a year. A thirty-year-old computer programmer may require three to six months to solve a visual problem that causes significant eye strain. Children and adults with visual challenges such as the following are often benefitted by vision therapy.

  • Learning-related Vision Problems

    Vision Therapy can help those individuals who lack the necessary visual skills for effective reading, writing, and learning (i.e., eye movement and focusing skills, convergence, eye-hand activity, visual memory skills, etc.).
  • Poor Binocular Coordination

    Vision Therapy helps individuals develop normal coordination and teamwork of the two eyes (binocular vision). When the two eyes fail to work together as an effective team, performance in many areas can suffer (reading, sports, depth perception, eye contact, etc.).
  • Strabismus and Amblyopia

    Vision Therapy programs offer much higher cure rates for turned eyes and/or lazy eye when compared to eye surgery, glasses, and/or patching, without therapy. The earlier the patient receives Vision Therapy the better; however, there has been successfully treated patients well past 21 years of age.
  • Stress-induced Visual Difficulties

    Twenty first century lifestyles demand more from our vision than ever before. Children and adults in our technological society constantly use their near vision at work and at home. C.V.S. (Computer Vision Syndrome) is one of the fastest growing health concerns in the workplace today. Environmental stresses on the visual system (including excessive computer use or close work) can induce eyestrain, headaches, and/or visual difficulties which can be effectively treated with corrective lenses and/or Vision Therapy.
     

    Vision Therapy is not administered directly in our office. Dr. Gardner will perform her comprehensive eye exam which includes tests to screen for visual function issues.  If there are signs and/or symptoms that show a likely need for Vision Therapy, a consult will be made to Dr. Robert Fox.

    Vision therapy can effectively treat eye movement disorders, inefficient eye teaming, misaligned eyes, poorly developed vision, focusing problems, and other visual information processing disorders.

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    Frequently Asked Questions

    The following are some frequently asked questions about vision therapy:

    Is Vision Therapy New?

    Although it is a dynamic optometric specialty that improves visual function and performance, vision therapy is actually an outgrowth of orthoptics. Orthoptics, which literally means "straightening of the eyes,” was introduced to this country by physicians in the late 1800s. As physicians became more focused on eyeglasses, medication, and surgery, the benefits of orthoptics were taught to fewer and fewer practitioners. However, optometrists in the mid 1900's took the best that orthoptics had to offer, and pioneered the development of vision therapy.

    What Is Involved in a Vision Therapy Program?

    Each program is tailor-made for each patient. Patients will typically need in-office therapy once a week. In addition, patients will be given a set of exercises to do at home. This reinforces what was learned during the office therapy training sessions. Commitment to the therapy program and maintaining a schedule of visits to the office are important in the success of the program. For patients who are unable to visit the office frequently, some binocular vision problems can be treated with an at-home training program that can be done on your computer. The programs are designed to address your weaknesses and can be monitored by the doctor.

    Will My Insurance Cover Vision Therapy?

    Vision Therapy is rarely fully covered by insurance. Some of the better health insurance policies cover the medical aspect of vision therapy. Coverage has no relationship to vision care plans which cover eye examinations, eyeglasses, or contact lenses once every year or two.

    How Long Does Vision Therapy Last?

    When the program is complete, the benefits of vision therapy will last for a lifetime. Accurate focusing and the efficient use of both eyes together is a reflex which, when conditioned, should operate effortlessly. Self-monitoring activities are prescribed at the end of each therapy program. Non-medical vision therapy, as related to visual perception, prepares children for lifelong learning, and it fills in gaps for many adults who have lost visual skills and abilities.

     

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